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  • Orange wine goes back a long way – from humble beginnings in Georgia, Slovenia and the world’s oldest wine regions, it disappeared into obscurity for centuries. Since its rediscovery in the last couple of decades, it has morphed and adapted to fit into our modern wine culture.


    When Orange wines first burst back onto the scenes at the more avant-garde establishments in London, they were designed to show the extent of what an Orange wine could be; to distance themselves from Whites – and more importantly, Rosé. Deep colour, cloudy appearance, scrumpy-like characteristics with high levels of tannin, phenolic elements, savoury flavours, spice and more. Pioneering producers like Josko Gravner and Stanko Radikon in Friuli used long skin maceration and no sulphites and the wines were structured, dry and muscular.  They took some drinking and needed the right food but there was no denying the allure and complexity of these unusual wines.

    Fast forward 23 years or so and now people are really catching on and starting to love these amber elixirs but also are craving easier styles.  Winemakers, ever influenced by the fast paced development of the natural wine movement are aiming for a more refined style, with shorter periods of skin contact, less extraction and ageing in stainless steel or concrete tanks to preserve freshness of flavour and avoid oxidative characters. Many of the orange wines we’re seeing now have all the elegance of their white counterparts, but with more profound texture and depth.


    Producers like Craig Hawkins in Swartland are making wines completely transformed from their deep coloured, tannic and hearty heritage.  His Skin Contact 2018 is a delicate orange hue and has elegant aromas of flowers, fruits and herbs with just a touch of the classic phenolic component of orange wine. Some of our other more delicate favourites include L’Orange from Domaine de Courbissac, and Marius et Simone from Domaine Giachino, wines that are fresh, elegant and precise. Not that we don't love the more hardcore stuff too and Radikon's long aged Ribolla and Paolo Vodopivec's Magnificent Vitovska take pride of place among our range of some 40 odd orange wines.

    But we are delighted to see this evolution in the category and such a diversity of styles emerging. Natural winemakers love to experiment and respond to developing tastes which is all the better for the thirsty wine lover.

    The future's bright, the future's orange!

     

    We have created a mixed case for those wanting to try a variety of Orange wines....

    This fantastic case includes: 2 bottles of Jakot Nando, a light, aromatic Slovenian wine; 2 bottles of Toscana Bianco Procanico, a robust and rare Tuscan variety; 2 bottles of Baby Bandito Stay Brave, a lovely, entry level offering from Craig Hawkins. It also includes: 2 bottles of Marius et Simione from the Mountains; 1 bottle of Radikon Jakot from the King of Orange Wines in Friuli; 1 bottle of Courbissac l'Orange; 1 bottle of Zagreo Fiano from Campania, rich and complex and a bottle of Cattarato by Aldo Viola. Enjoy!

    £250.00
    Free Postage for Mainland UK with this case.

    (See also our 6 bottle Orange Wine case and other mixed cases in our Mixed Cases Section)

  • We did it again! Decanter's number one for natural wines, we are really chuffed. A massive thank you to all our on-line customers who love natural wines and want to drink right. So to celebrate natural wine this month, buy a mixed dozen of any natural, organic or biodynamic wine and get 10% off the listed price!

    Simply enter MYMIXEDCASE into the discount code in the shopping cart on our website.

    Remember, it must be a MIXED CASE, a minimum of 6 different wines (we love you to try things) and they must be listed as natural, organic or biodynamic in the attributes.  Enjoy. Continue reading

  • It’s funny how a bit of sunshine hits, and suddenly we see the world through rose tinted glasses. As a wine merchant, the first glimpse of summer and we see sales of rosé suddenly go through the roof. Sadly, the rest of the year, we tend to see pink wine as being an inferior creation as a result of an incestuous relationship between red and white grapes (which is of course, not usually the case!). In fact, Rosé is thought to be one of the oldest styles of wine. Certainly we'd agree that pink wine is not to be snubbed, and ought to be treated with the dignity and respect of a wine of such age. Continue reading

  • In this mini-series, we’ll be working our way through the alphabet, looking at some famous grapes, wines, and other associated terms. For our first foray into the world of wine, we’ve gone with Aglianico – a grape sometimes referred to as the Barolo of the South. Continue reading

  • Stephanie Cvetkovic - uses for cork

    Today, blogger Stephanie from Expert Home Tips, is here to share with us some truly amazing uses for wine corks. Prepare to fall in love with wine all over again! Continue reading

  • Madeira is magical wine. It is quite literally created by doing all the things that any self-respecting wine makers tries to avoid, yet results in one of the most indestructible, and utterly delicious creations in the known world.

    Yum!

    What is it? Madeira comes from the Portuguese Island off the coast of North Africa of the same name, and refers to the fortified wines that come from there. They range from dry to sweet styles and there are different age categorisations for each style. Continue reading

  • How to Choose the Right Storage for Your Wine

    For wine fans, a mere 3x3 wine rack simply isn’t enough to hold their collection.  Once you start collecting wine, you start to understand that fine wine needs more than a shelf in the kitchen cupboard or a rack in the pantry.  There are different options for storing wine so what are they and how do you decide what is right for your collection? Continue reading

  • This month we have selected a few natural beauties from the Languedoc for you to get your taste buds into.  The Languedoc is awash with wine but not many are as distinctive as Fred Porro's and few have the same story of determination over adversity behind their production.   The new vintages are in and so this month's mixed case is from Monsieur Porro's domaine.
    It is Spring in the vineyards and buds are bursting as the vines are well and truly coming to life after their winter's hibernation.  Step into a natural vineyard at this time of year and you are overcome with the aromas of spring flowers and vegetation as the place just oozes life, it is an intoxicating experience that lifts both body and mind, no wander these natural wine makers are so happy, it's not just all the booze! Continue reading

  • Pinot Noir clone 777 signAfter a recent visit from Abi from Good Hope’s marketing team, we thought we’d spill the beans on these excellent wines. Not 100% natural, but that’s ok, this is a winery that works as close to natural as possible - responsible farming, no spraying, only natural yeasts allowed and a minimum of sulphur. Referring to the winery as Good Hope is perhaps slightly misleading as the winery have several labels including The Winery of Good Hope, and Radford Dale, but Good Hope seems an affectionate enough term to use for all of them. Based in Somerset West in South Africa, they source their grapes from a number of sites across Stellenbosch, Elgin and Swartland to ensure consistency of quality. Continue reading

  • The team at Josmeyer before Jean's death (right) The team at Josmeyer

    Domaine Josmeyer was founded in 1854 by restaurant owner Aloyse Meyer who set about building on his links with the wine trade. Since then, the estate has passed through 5 generations of the Meyer family, with Jean Meyer - responsible for most of the wines we stock today - taking over in 1966. In 2000 he switched the entire estate to organic and biodynamic culture. He is credited with elevating the estate to one of Alsace’s greats, and with injecting the wines with their unique sense of cultural place by combining his love of contemporary art with his produce. After his death earlier this year, his daughters Celine and Isabelle took over running of the estate. Continue reading

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