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Buon Vino Natural Wine Blog

  • D is for Dry A-Z of wine: D - Dry

    Blogs about wine get so dry don’t they. Sorry about that! We do try! But what does that even mean? What does it mean to be dry? Well when we’re talking about wine, we're literally referring to the amount of sugar that’s left in a wine after the fermentation. Continue reading

  • Natural Wine Burgundy

    Athenais de Beru

    Although some are not convinced by natural wines, most people agree that the wines made by Athenais at the magnificent Chateau de Beru in Chablis are pretty amazing and delicious.  When you visit the Chateau, you are awed by the grandeur of the place; this is very obviously old aristocratic France and the family name which is that of the small Hamlet where the Chateau is located goes back centuries.  Continue reading

  • It’s funny how a bit of sunshine hits, and suddenly we see the world through rose tinted glasses. As a wine merchant, the first glimpse of summer and we see sales of rosé suddenly go through the roof. Sadly, the rest of the year, we tend to see pink wine as being an inferior creation as a result of an incestuous relationship between red and white grapes (which is of course, not usually the case!). In fact, Rosé is thought to be one of the oldest styles of wine. Certainly we'd agree that pink wine is not to be snubbed, and ought to be treated with the dignity and respect of a wine of such age. Continue reading

  • Unassuming but magnificent wines

    Alain Castex and his partner Ghislaine were two of the original ‘Garagistas’, small vigneron/wine makers whose limited means forced them to make wine literally ‘in the Garage’, in their case, an old Citroen car garage borrowed from a friend.  The original vineyard purchased in the early 90s and the one which made them famous is called Le Casot de Mailloles and is based on the steep schistous slopes above the Mediterranean in Banyuls.  Continue reading

  • Chardonnay, or as I like to call it affectionately, ‘Cardonnay’*. Perhaps wine’s most misunderstood grape. I have lost count of the number of times people have said ‘I hate Chardonnay’, and then proceeded to buy a Chablis – 100% Chardonnay without the word on the label. Continue reading

  • B for BacchusFor the second in our A-Z series, I’ve chosen to talk about Bacchus, a lesser known grape variety that has played a big role in the success of English wines of late.

    Bacchus is a variety made by crossing the Sylvaner X Riesling hybrid with Muller-Thurgau, which was first developed in the Pfalz region of Germany in the 1930s. It’s a pretty hardy grape variety which tends towards high sugar and early ripening, which is perfect for Britain’s marginal climate, and as a result is now the 4th most planted grape in England. Grown elsewhere and its lack of acid can lead to flabby wines, but here, the cooler temperatures and shorter ripening season ensures that the fresh acidity is retained, producing wines which have been likened to Sancerre and other crisp Sauvignons. Continue reading

  • In this mini-series, we’ll be working our way through the alphabet, looking at some famous grapes, wines, and other associated terms. For our first foray into the world of wine, we’ve gone with Aglianico – a grape sometimes referred to as the Barolo of the South. Continue reading

  • In day to day life, the only yeasts we tend to come across are ‘dried active bread yeast’ or the sort that you need a cream for (and the less said about those, the better). However, hundreds of strains of yeast occur naturally all around us. In vineyards, certain strains will cling to the grapes and the cellars, so crush grapes in a barrel and the yeasts will set to work converting sugar into alcohol. Without this step, the wine is just grape juice (and probably not very nice at that!) Continue reading

  • This week we were lucky enough to be visited by one of our favourite winemakers, Judith Beck, from Austria. It’s not often the real deal pops by, and it just so happened to coincide with a trade tasting event we had on, so she had quite the crowd! Discussing afterwards however, we were struck by just how few women we could think of in the winemaking world. Continue reading

  • Lots of people pop into the shop in the search for low sulphur or even zero sulphur wines and we are happy to try and help get them on the natural wine track. Sulphur is a natural by-product of fermentation. Sulphur Dioxide (SO2) preserves wine. It stops wine from oxidising and extends the ‘life’ of a wine. Here at Buon Vino, we are completely sold on the benefits and taste of natural wine and feel that maybe extending the ‘life’ of an overly filtered, fined and preserved conventional wine may not be such a great idea after all. Continue reading

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