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Buon Vino Natural Wine Blog

  • A few thoughts on Loire Valley wine.....

    Natural Wine The Loire is oozing natural wine!

    The Romans started it - they started most things - centuries ago when they discovered the Loire was perfect for grape growing and also that it has a conveniently placed river to transport the harvest.  The Loire was the last place to be affected by phylloxera and the last to recover.  Today it has 69 AOPs or appellations, and boasts a dizzying array of grape varieties, 'Terroirs', and styles of wine.  In short, the Loire is cool and the wines are amazingly good. Continue reading

  • The landscape and climate of northern France's beautiful Loire Valley is incredibly varied, which means the region produces a fascinating range of styles of wine.  With barbeque season just round the corner (there's a great weather forecast for the last week of May!) you're probably on the look out for something to pair with your alfresco eating.  This region is a great source of food-friendly wines - and is the inspiration for the next wine tasting evening at our shop. Continue reading

  • It's fair to say that Lambrusco may have struggled with an image problem in the past.  (Anybody remember the Lambrini girls?!)  The great news is, you can put any preconceived ideas aside because we have some stunning, naturally frothy wines for you to try, from Cinque Campi in Emilia Romagna. Continue reading

  • This month we have selected a few natural beauties from the Languedoc for you to get your taste buds into.  The Languedoc is awash with wine but not many are as distinctive as Fred Porro's and few have the same story of determination over adversity behind their production.   The new vintages are in and so this month's mixed case is from Monsieur Porro's domaine.
    It is Spring in the vineyards and buds are bursting as the vines are well and truly coming to life after their winter's hibernation.  Step into a natural vineyard at this time of year and you are overcome with the aromas of spring flowers and vegetation as the place just oozes life, it is an intoxicating experience that lifts both body and mind, no wander these natural wine makers are so happy, it's not just all the booze! Continue reading

  • So, Christmas is over, and before you know it, card shops and florists galore are jumping on the Valentine’s bandwagon to make you and your loved one feel special for a day. We, as a wine shop, are no exception. But we would like to help you in your exploits by providing you with a guide to aphrodisiac foods and what to pair with them. Even if the sensual slime of an oyster can’t get your pulse racing, you are bound to be feeling amorous after a glass or two of bubbly. Sit back, relax and let us take care of the menu for you. Continue reading

  • When trying to find someone a bottle of wine to take away with them, I usually ask what style of wine they prefer. A response I quite often get is “I like dry whites, like Sauvignon Blanc, not sweet ones like Chardonnay”. There is absolutely nothing wrong with this response, as it gives me a pretty good idea on what the customer is looking for, though probe a little further, and those commonly used winespeak terms ‘dry’ and ‘sweet’ can cause problems in communication, particularly when it comes to whites. Continue reading

  • A big question, there is quite a lot to know but basically Orange wine is made from white grapes but in the way they make red wine.  It breaks down this like.  All wine is made from the juice of the grape and virtually all juice is clear (a handful of exceptions have pink pulp like Alicante Buschet, Moscato Rosa and Gamay Chaudenay, we have a beautiful example of that one from Julien Courtois!).  To make red they squeeze out the juice from the red grapes but then add the skins back in to extract the red colour from the skin.  To make white they squeeze out the juice, discard the white skins and then ferment just the clear juice.  To make Orange, they squeeze out the juice from the white grapes but then add the skins back in.  White grapes have a bit of colour pigment in the skins, more or less depending on the grape, (Pinot Grigio for example when ripe has quite a pink hue hence the name, Sauvignon Blanc, much paler) and so the skin contact imparts an orange or rusty appearance to the wine.  But that's not all..... Continue reading

  • The delights of wine made from pure white Rice!

    Akashi-Tai Sake

    Sake is one of those mystical beverages, shrouded in custom and steeped in history. A rice wine most commonly associated with Japan, there are actually a number of different types of sake, which can be made from around 50 different varieties of rice - no Basmati here. Rudimentary forms of the drink would have been made by grinding rice up with your teeth and spitting it into a container to allow a natural fermentation to take place. Thankfully the process is a little more rigorous these days. Continue reading

  • Pinot Noir clone 777 signAfter a recent visit from Abi from Good Hope’s marketing team, we thought we’d spill the beans on these excellent wines. Not 100% natural, but that’s ok, this is a winery that works as close to natural as possible - responsible farming, no spraying, only natural yeasts allowed and a minimum of sulphur. Referring to the winery as Good Hope is perhaps slightly misleading as the winery have several labels including The Winery of Good Hope, and Radford Dale, but Good Hope seems an affectionate enough term to use for all of them. Based in Somerset West in South Africa, they source their grapes from a number of sites across Stellenbosch, Elgin and Swartland to ensure consistency of quality. Continue reading

  • The team at Josmeyer before Jean's death (right) The team at Josmeyer

    Domaine Josmeyer was founded in 1854 by restaurant owner Aloyse Meyer who set about building on his links with the wine trade. Since then, the estate has passed through 5 generations of the Meyer family, with Jean Meyer - responsible for most of the wines we stock today - taking over in 1966. In 2000 he switched the entire estate to organic and biodynamic culture. He is credited with elevating the estate to one of Alsace’s greats, and with injecting the wines with their unique sense of cultural place by combining his love of contemporary art with his produce. After his death earlier this year, his daughters Celine and Isabelle took over running of the estate. Continue reading

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